Baptism: The Ace of Grace

Posted on August 24, 2012. Filed under: Culture, Relationships, Spiritual Growth, Theology | Tags: , |


If you’re into Swedish Rock or 90’s pop, then chances are you’ve memorized  “The Sign” by Ace of Base.  “I saw the sign, and it opened up my mind, I saw the sign…” Sorry, that will likely be in your head now.

At it’s core, that’s what baptism is for many Christians, including yours truly. A sign, not a Swedish Rock band, in case you were confused. When God gives us a covenant, he marks it with an external sign.  The sign of the old covenant was circumcision, and the sign of the new covenant is baptism:

Paul writes, “When you came to Christ, you were “circumcised,” but not by a physical procedure. Christ performed a spiritual circumcision—the cutting away of your sinful nature. For you were buried with Christ when you were baptized. And with him you were raised to new life because you trusted the mighty power of God, who raised Christ from the dead” (Colossians 2:11-12).

Christians are not set apart physically, instead we are differentiated from others by our faith in Christ. Baptism is a marker for this faith and a sign that points to a new life in Christ. Though the sign of the new covenant leaves no physical distinction, there are still outward indications a person has faith in Christ through their works (James 2:14-26).

I acknowledge, not everyone would agree that baptism is simply a sign. Some denominations even believe it is required for entry into paradise (bummer for the thief on the cross). Indeed, there’s a lot of controversy surrounding baptism because it’s something people take seriously, and rightly so. A red flag should go up when people don’t take committing (or recommitting) their life to Christ seriously. But I don’t think we should get so hung up on the details that we lose focus on what’s important, celebrating a brother or sister coming into the Church.

With that being said, this is my blog so I’m going to explain where I come down on the issue: baptism is a public statement indicating a faith in Christ and marking the beginning of a life in him.

Without rehashing the Protestant Reformation, I believe that faith in Christ is the cornerstone of Christianity and that it is only by faith that we are justified with God (John 3:16, Romans 3:22, Ephesians 2:8). Because baptism is a sign of this faith, my husband and I chose not to baptize our children, after all, they have no faith in Christ yet (or any concept of faith at all). We’re working on potty-training for now. We pray with every fiber of our beings that one day we will witness their testament to faith in him, but we believe that is their choice, not ours. Sprinkling them with water won’t change this.

That being said, there is biblical precedence for parents attesting that they will raise their children to love God and for dedicating children to the Lord (Deuteronomy 6:7). For that reason, we have chosen to dedicate our sons in front of our church so that our brothers and sisters can hold us accountable to raising them in the faith.

There are lessons I take from Christ’s baptism. Not only was he a man (rather than an infant), but he made a public declaration. The thing about public statements is that they have a way of holding you accountable (assuming of course your witnesses hold you accountable). For that reason, I think it’s important for baptisms, dedications, and weddings to be done publicly.

Secondly, when Jesus went down to the Jordan River, he was likely submerged by its waters rather than getting a little sprinkle on the forehead (the Greek for baptism actually means ‘to submerge’). I think there’s something symbolic about being completely washed by the waters, after all Christ takes away all our sins, not just a few. But I also contend this is not, and should not, be a sticking point of baptism.

So that’s it for my personal beliefs: a public statement of faith, preferably with a lot of water. I realize not everyone agrees with me, and I recognize some good arguments for the opposing views which I hope you will share in the comments.

If you’re exploring “the sign” for yourself or your children, I hope you take your decision seriously. After all, as some wise Swedes once said, “No one’s gonna drag you up to get into the light where you belong.”

Advertisements

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

5 Responses to “Baptism: The Ace of Grace”

RSS Feed for the renewed way Comments RSS Feed

Many believe baptism is a sacrament, therefore of far more substance and significance than a mere sign of faith.

I hope it didn’t seem like I trivialized baptism by claiming it was a sign. I certainly think it’s something sacred to each believer and the Church as a whole.

Perhaps you could clarify what you meant by ‘sacrament’ – after all, Google defines it as “A religious ceremony or act of the Christian Church that is regarded as an outward and visible SIGN of divine grace, in particular.”

Looked forward to reading this for a while and you did such a great job. Loved the first point about being accountable because of public forum. Sometimes I think we forget the true meaning behind things and just do them out of tradition (or an excuse to throw a party). I think in this life even children have freedom in their faith and it is our job as parents not to merely have water placed on them but as you said “raise your children to love God.”

I’m so glad you enjoyed it Lacey. Thanks for your comment!

[…] Baptism: The Ace of Grace (therenewedway.wordpress.com) […]


Where's The Comment Form?

  • Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 32 other followers

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: